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Amgen and Jay Leno Partner on Cholesterol 911, A New Disease State Awareness Campaign

Amgen has partnered with comedian and television host Jay Leno on Cholesterol 911, a national initiative urging high-risk cardiovascular disease patients to reduce their risk of another heart attack or stroke by addressing their continued high LDL-C, or “bad” cholesterol. Leno helps motivate patients and caregivers to get in the driver’s seat as it relates to their cholesterol management.

“I have high cholesterol that thankfully I am able to control with the help of my doctor, but I’ve learned from some close friends about its connection to their heart attack or stroke,” said Leno.

In the United States someone has a heart attack every 40 seconds.2 Bad cholesterol, also known as LDL-C, is one of the most important modifiable risk factors for heart attack.3 While many people may be able to reduce their cholesterol through diet, exercise or medication, those who have experienced a previous heart attack or stroke and still struggle with high bad cholesterol despite current treatment may require additional treatment options to further reduce their cardiovascular risk.


“I have a lifelong passion for all kinds of vehicles, and I love driving them, but being in the back of an ambulance is not somewhere I ever want to end up,” continued Leno. “I hope this effort encourages people to see the emergency in high cholesterol and talk to their doctor to explore what more they can do to lower their cholesterol and risk of having another heart attack or stroke.”

To learn more about Jay Leno’s story and for additional information and resources, visit www.Cholesterol911.com .