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Applying the Power of Omics to R&D




In a drive to transform how medicines are discovered, developed, and used, Amgen and its deCODE Genetics subsidiary are mining human data at a scale that was once unimaginable. The latest feature story in Amgen Science takes an in-depth look at this important new element of Amgen’s R&D strategy. An excerpt:

There’s enough raw information in a single human genome to fill a small library—and genomics is just one branch in the burgeoning field of science informally known as “omics.” Our genes are like unspoken words until they’re transcribed into RNA, and the science of transcriptomics can tell us which genes are being expressed and which are silent. RNA, in turn, is the template cells use to assemble the myriad proteins that drive biology, and proteomics now offers a detailed census of proteins present in blood or tissue.

The data points flowing from various branches of omics are like pixels that can be pieced together to build a sharper picture of how disease takes root and develops. The technology has the potential to deliver new biomarkers for earlier diagnosis of disease, faster and more successful clinical trials, and the ability to predict and prevent disease before it becomes more grievous and costly.

View the video above to hear more about the potential of omics to transform R&D, and read the full feature story at Amgen Science.